Please Whitelist This Site?

I know everyone hates ads. But please understand that I am providing premium content for free that takes hundreds of hours of time to research and write. I don't want to go to a pay-only model like some sites, but when more and more people block ads, I end up working for free. And I have a family to support, just like you. :)

If you like The TCP/IP Guide, please consider the download version. It's priced very economically and you can read all of it in a convenient format without ads.

If you want to use this site for free, I'd be grateful if you could add the site to the whitelist for Adblock. To do so, just open the Adblock menu and select "Disable on tcpipguide.com". Or go to the Tools menu and select "Adblock Plus Preferences...". Then click "Add Filter..." at the bottom, and add this string: "@@||tcpipguide.com^$document". Then just click OK.

Thanks for your understanding!

Sincerely, Charles Kozierok
Author and Publisher, The TCP/IP Guide


NOTE: Using software to mass-download the site degrades the server and is prohibited.
If you want to read The TCP/IP Guide offline, please consider licensing it. Thank you.

The Book is Here... and Now On Sale!

Read offline with no ads or diagram watermarks!
The TCP/IP Guide

Custom Search







Table Of Contents  The TCP/IP Guide
 9  TCP/IP Application Layer Protocols, Services and Applications (OSI Layers 5, 6 and 7)
      9  TCP/IP Key Applications and Application Protocols
           9  TCP/IP File and Message Transfer Applications and Protocols (FTP, TFTP, Electronic Mail, USENET, HTTP/WWW, Gopher)
                9  TCP/IP World Wide Web (WWW, "The Web") and the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP)
                     9  TCP/IP World Wide Web and Hypertext Overview and Concepts

Previous Topic/Section
World Wide Web and Hypertext Overview and History
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
12
3
Next Page
World Wide Web Media and the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML)
Next Topic/Section

World Wide Web System Concepts and Components
(Page 3 of 3)

Web Hardware and Software

These three main components are supplemented by a number of other elements that play “supporting roles” in rounding out the system as a whole. Chief among these are the hardware and software used to implement client/server communication that makes the Web work: Web servers and Web browsers.

Web servers are computers that run special server software to allow them to provide hypertext documents and other files to clients who request them. Millions of such machines around the world now serve as a virtual, distributed repository of the enormous wealth of information that the Web represents.

Web browsers are HTTP client software programs that run on TCP/IP client computers to access Web documents on Web servers. These browser programs retrieve hypertext documents and display them, and also implement many of the Web's advanced features, such as caching. Today's browsers support a wide variety of media, allowing the Web to implement many different functions aside from simply hypertext document transfer. Examples include displaying images, playing sounds and implementing interactive programs.

Last but certainly not least, it is the users of the Web that are perhaps its most important component. This is sort of “cheating”, as this is in some ways like defining the Internet as being part of the Web. At the same time, I feel that user involvement has had more of a role in shaping the development of Web technology than any other networking application. The Web began as a simple means of exchanging documents; today it has grown to encompass thousands of different applications and services, largely as a result of the creativity of users. Content providers have pushed the boundaries of what the Web can do by creating new ideas for information and services, to satisfy the insatiable demands of the end user community.

Key Concept: The World Wide Web is a complete system that is comprised of a number of related components, of which three are most essential. The first is Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), which describes how hypertext documents are constructed; HTML is what allows links between documents to be represented. The second is the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), the application layer protocol that moves hypertext and other documents over the Web. The third is the Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) mechanism, which provides a consistent means of identifying resources, both on the Web and more generally on the Internet as a whole.



Previous Topic/Section
World Wide Web and Hypertext Overview and History
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
12
3
Next Page
World Wide Web Media and the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML)
Next Topic/Section

If you find The TCP/IP Guide useful, please consider making a small Paypal donation to help the site, using one of the buttons below. You can also donate a custom amount using the far right button (not less than $1 please, or PayPal gets most/all of your money!) In lieu of a larger donation, you may wish to consider purchasing a download license of The TCP/IP Guide. Thanks for your support!
Donate $2
Donate $5
Donate $10
Donate $20
Donate $30
Donate: $



Home - Table Of Contents - Contact Us

The TCP/IP Guide (http://www.TCPIPGuide.com)
Version 3.0 - Version Date: September 20, 2005

Copyright 2001-2005 Charles M. Kozierok. All Rights Reserved.
Not responsible for any loss resulting from the use of this site.