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Table Of Contents  The TCP/IP Guide
 9  TCP/IP Lower-Layer (Interface, Internet and Transport) Protocols (OSI Layers 2, 3 and 4)
      9  TCP/IP Internet Layer (OSI Network Layer) Protocols
           9  TCP/IP Routing Protocols (Gateway Protocols)
                9  TCP/IP Interior Routing Protocols (RIP, OSPF, GGP, HELLO, IGRP, EIGRP)
                     9  TCP/IP Routing Information Protocol (RIP, RIP-2 and RIPng)
                          9  RIP Fundamentals and General Operation

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RIP Fundamentals and General Operation
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3
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RIP Route Determination Algorithm and Metric
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RIP Overview, History, Standards and Versions
(Page 3 of 3)

Development of RIP Version 2 (RIP-2) and RIPng for IPv6

Some other issues with RIP were a result of its having been developed in the early 1980s when TCP/IP was still in its infancy. Over time, as the use of TCP/IP protocols changed, RIP became outdated. In response, RIP Version 2, or RIP-2 was created in the early 1990s. RIP-2 defines a new message format for RIP and includes a number of new features, including support for classless addressing, authentication, and the use of multicasting instead of broadcasting to improve network performance. It was first defined in RFC 1388, RIP Version 2 Carrying Additional Information, published in January 1993. This RFC was revised in RFC 1723, and finalized in RFC 2453, RIP Version 2, November 1998.

Over two decades after it was first created, RIP continues to be a popular interior routing protocol. Its limitations have led to many internetworking experts hoping that the protocol would eventually “go away”, in favor of newer protocols like OSPF that are superior on a strictly technical basis. Some have gone so far as to sarcastically suggest that maybe it would be best if RIP would “R. I. P.” (“rest in peace”.) J Once a protocol becomes popular, however, it's hard to resist momentum, and RIP is likely to continue to be used for many years to come.

In order to ensure that RIP can work with TCP/IP in the future, it was necessary to define a version that would work with the new Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6). In 1997, RFC 2080 was published, titled RIPng for IPv6. The ng stands for next generation—recall that IPv6 is also sometimes called IPng. RIPng is not just a new version of RIP, like RIP-2, but is defined as a new standalone protocol. It is, however, based closely on the original RIP and RIP-2 standards. A distinct protocol (as opposed to a revision of the original) was needed due to the changes made between IPv4 and IPv6, though RIP and RIPng work in the same basic way. RIPng is sometimes also called RIPv6.

Key Concept: The original version of RIP has the fewest features and is now called RIP-1. RIP-2 was created to add support for classless addressing and other capabilities. RIPng is the version created for compatibility with IPv6.



Previous Topic/Section
RIP Fundamentals and General Operation
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
12
3
Next Page
RIP Route Determination Algorithm and Metric
Next Topic/Section

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