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The TCP/IP Guide

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Table Of Contents  The TCP/IP Guide
 9  TCP/IP Lower-Layer (Interface, Internet and Transport) Protocols (OSI Layers 2, 3 and 4)
      9  TCP/IP Transport Layer Protocols
           9  Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and User Datagram Protocol (UDP)
                9  TCP/IP Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)
                     9  TCP Reliability and Flow Control Features and Protocol Modifications

Previous Topic/Section
TCP "Silly Window Syndrome" and Changes To the Sliding Window System For Avoiding Small-Window Problems
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23
Next Page
Summary Comparison of TCP/IP Transport Layer Protocols (UDP and TCP)
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TCP Congestion Handling and Congestion Avoidance Algorithms
(Page 1 of 3)

By changing the window size that a device advertises to a peer on a TCP connection, the device can increase or decrease the rate at which its peer sends it data. This is how the TCP sliding window system implements flow control between the two connected devices. We've seen how this works in the last few topics, including the changes required to the “basic” mechanism to ensure performance remains high by reducing the number of small segments sent.

Why TCP Must Monitor and Deal With Internetwork Congestion

Flow control is a very important part of regulating the transmission of data between devices, but it is limited in the following respect: it only considers what is going on within each of the devices on the connection, and not what is happening in devices between them. In fact, this “self-centeredness” is symptomatic of architectural layering. Since we are dealing with how TCP works between a typical server and client at layer four, we don't worry about how data gets between them; that's the job of the Internet Protocol at layer three.

In practice, what is going on at layer three can be quite important. Considered from an abstract point of view, our server and client may be connected “directly” using TCP, but all the segments we transmit are carried across an internetwork of networks and routers between them. These networks and routers are also carrying data from many other connections and higher-layer protocols. If the internetwork becomes very busy, the speed at which segments are carried between the endpoints of our connection will be reduced, and they could even be dropped. This is called congestion.

Again, at the TCP level, there is no way to directly comprehend what is causing congestion or why. It is perceived simply as inefficiencies in moving data from one device to another, through the need for some segments to be retransmitted. However, even though TCP is mostly oblivious of what is happening on the internetwork, it must be smart enough to understand how to deal with congestion and not exacerbate it.

Recall that each segment that is transmitted is placed on the retransmission queue with a retransmission timer. Now, suppose congestion dramatically increased on the internetwork, and there were no mechanisms in place to handle congestion. Segments would be delayed or dropped, which would cause them to time out and be retransmitted. This would increase the amount of traffic on the internetwork between our client and server. Furthermore, there might be thousands of other TCP connections behaving similarly. Each would keep retransmitting more and more segments, increasing congestion further, leading to a vicious circle. Performance of the entire internetwork would decrease dramatically, resulting in a condition called congestion collapse.

The message is clear: TCP cannot just ignore what is happening on the internetwork between its connection endpoints. To this end, TCP includes several specific algorithms that are designed to respond to congestion, or avoid it in the first place. Many of these techniques can be considered, in a way, to be methods by which a TCP connection is made less “selfish”—that is, it tries to take into account the existence of other users of the internetwork over which it operates. While no single connection by itself can solve congestion of an entire internetwork, having all devices implement these measures collectively reduces congestion due to TCP.

The first issue is that we need to know when congestion is taking place. By definition, congestion means intermediate devices—routers—are overloaded. Routers respond to overloading by dropping datagrams. When these datagrams contain TCP segments, the segments don't reach their destination, and they are therefore left unacknowledged and will eventually expire and be retransmitted. This means that when a device sends TCP segments and does not receive acknowledgments for them, it can be assumed that in most cases, they have been dropped by intermediate devices due to congestion. By detecting the rate at which segments are sent and not acknowledged, a TCP device can infer the level of congestion on the network between itself and its TCP connection peer.


Previous Topic/Section
TCP "Silly Window Syndrome" and Changes To the Sliding Window System For Avoiding Small-Window Problems
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
23
Next Page
Summary Comparison of TCP/IP Transport Layer Protocols (UDP and TCP)
Next Topic/Section

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